How to update Composer on Linux Mint 18.3

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When you install Composer (the dependency manager for PHP) globally on Linux Mint 18.3 with the package manager…

$ sudo apt install composer
$ composer -V
Composer version @package_branch_alias_version@ (1.0.0-beta2) 2016-03-27 16:00:34

…you’ll get the totally outdated version 1.0.0-beta2. The problem is that this version does not support extracting compressed package files ‘tar.gz’. It also does not support updating itself with:

$ composer selfupdate

So, you need to download the latest composer version (currently 1.6.2) manually and then put it into the directory /usr/local/bin/composer (which overrides /usr/bin/composer)

$ sudo mv composer.phar /usr/local/bin/composer
$ chmod +x /usr/local/bin/composer

now login – logout to apply the changes, voila:

$ composer -V
Composer version 1.6.2 2018-01-05 15:28:41

How to automount your virtualbox shared folder to /var/www

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After adding the shared folder Websites to fstab by adding the line

Websites /var/www vboxsf rw,uid=33,gid=33 0 0

and giving the right permissions, I always got the following error during my virtual Linux Mint boot:

keys:Press S to skip mounting or M for manual recovery

All I had to do was add vboxsf on a line of its own in /etc/modules.
Solution found on askubuntu.com

Linux Mint 17: Install php_oci

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Quick cooking recipe to install PHP oci8 on Linux Mint 17 / 18.

  1. Download the Instant Client from the Oracle Website and follow the instructions at the bottom of the download page.
  2. Download the Instant Client SDK from the same location, unpack it and move the SDK folder to the same folder where the Instant client is installed. On Linux Mint this would be “/opt/oracle/instantclient_xy”
  3. “sudo pecl install oci8” and give path to your instant client when asked
  4. Add “extension=oci8.so” to your php.ini located at “/etc/php5/apache2/php.ini”
  5. restart apache “sudo apache2 -k restart”

Note: You can use phpinfo() to locate the used php.ini

Linux beginners trick: mount root shell to read-write

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If your Linux (Mint) fails to boot because you broke the /etc/fstab, for example, you’ll end up with a ready only root shell. The trick is to mount the root partition to as read-write without actually unmounting it:

# mount -o remount,rw /

After doing that, you wil be able to edit /etc/fstab, correct the error, and reboot normally.

Found on: How to fix Linux boot problems